The next level in ablutions facilities

The next level in ablutions facilities

A new “five-star” toilet pavilion at the retail tourist destination of Farmers Corner, Ashburton, was an exacting and innovative project for Ashburton company Quaid Construction.
Master builder Justin Quaid says the six cubicle pavilion, has some interesting features.Among these is a glass roof and fritted (dotted with an opaque pattern) glass on the cubicles. The 19.6mm thick roof glass weighs nine tonnes.
The glass was installed by Metro Glass, Christ-church, and is supported by intricate stainless steel “spider” fixings.
These are fixed to laminated veneer lumber beams which form a lattice pattern over a series of Oamaru stone fins and provide the divisions for the cubicles in a herringbone pattern.
The combination of glass, timber and stone required exacting attention to detail from a structural accuracy point of view to ensure fixings would attach correctly, Justin says.
Architype Architects and Designers, Dunedin owner, Tim Ross, says the intention was to create a pavilion that paid homage to its country environment; this is reflected in the herringbone design of the cubicles, the use of timber beams, regional stone, and in angling the cubicles to the rural views.
The pavilion is located on the entry axis of the main building in order to allow Farmers Corner’s visitors travelling on tour buses to locate bathroom facilities immediately upon arrival.
This axis continues right through the centre of the pavilion and leads the eye out into the surrounding rural landscape.
To either side of the central axis the pavilion is divided into private bathroom cubicles which look outward through full height fritted glass to the fields beyond, while ensuring privacy.
Once visitors have attended to their needs they are led back to the central open-air “breezeway” with a polished concrete floor where a four metre long double-sided stone vanity is located for hand washing.

The next level in ablutions facilities
The toilet pavilion is located on the entry axis of the main building in order to allow Farmers Corner’s visitors to locate bathroom facilities immediately upon arrival.

 
The overall effect, especially that of the exposed beams under the patterned glass roof, the shadows they cast on to the Oamaru stone, plus the minimalistic landscaping is almost zen-like.
“The client was wanting an exceptional exterior bathroom facility from the outset,” Tim says.
“The concept and the idea was to try and create a link with the outside and to engage with the landscape while they were on their very short stop. It’s been a very bespoke design.”Architype have trusted Quaid Construction with other projects and are good to work with, Tim says.
“We really enjoy working with them and they always come up with practical solutions and always ask questions at the right times.”
Farmer’s Corner general manager John Yang says the considerable investment in the bathroom pavilion is part of providing the best quality of service possible to overseas tourists and the bright, clean facility is one important element in the overall operation of the business.
“The toilet also adds one of the key organisational points for the tour bus because everywhere they want to go they need toilets.”
He believes the “five-star” facility is one of the best of its kind in the South Island and that it will attract more people to Farmers Corner, not just bus tours.
Along with commercial projects, Quaid Construction has expertise in a many areas including rural and residential work.
It is the Mid Canterbury agent for Specialised Structures, which specialises in customised portal framed buildings from structural steel, cold rolled steel and timber framing to concrete tilt panel construction.
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