An ‘iconic gateway’ for Hawke’s Bay

An ‘iconic gateway’ for Hawke’s Bay
The redevelopment project, which commenced early 2018, includes north and south expansion of the existing terminal building increasing the footprint from 2500sqm to

Unprecedented passenger growth is a key driver for the $21m redevelopment of Hawke’s Bay Airport’s terminal building and is the first major redevelopment since 2003.
In the last three year’s passenger movements through the terminal have risen 47 percent to nearly three quarters of a million, per financial year.
Hawke’s Bay Airport’s Commercial Manager, Dean Smith attributes the arrival of airline competition as a key reason for the growth.
“Competition brings pricing tension and there has been an elastic response to that resulting in significant growth in the use of air transport in and out of Hawke’s Bay.
“Tourism and a buoyant local economy are also key reasons for visitor growth to the area.”
The redevelopment project, which commenced early 2018, includes north and south expansion of the existing terminal building increasing the footprint from 2500sqm to 4340sqm and is being undertaken in three stages.
“The initial stage extends the existing building to the north and is now operational. That established a new arrivals area, including a fully automated baggage re-claim system and dedicated area for rental car kiosks.”
Now well advanced, stage two expands the south side and will house new check-in facilities for the airlines along with back of house facilities.
Dean says the second stage will be completed towards the end of 2019 enabling the airlines to decamp from their existing check in areas and relocate to their new homes.
The final stage involves joining the new sections with the existing central part of the building, which will be stripped out and refurbished, with a new and striking roof structure laid over the entire building.

An ‘iconic gateway’ for Hawke’s Bay
Stage two of the redevelopment expands the south side and will house new check-in facilities for the airlines along with back
of house facilities.

 
 
In the form of a bird in flight, the roof’s design references the Kuaka (godwit), a bird which nests in the nearby Ahuriri estuary.
“Local architectural practice Designgroup PMA Architects designed the re-development and col-laborated with Jacob Scott, local artist and a local Iwi representative.
Jacob is extremely creative and provided a lot of the design inspiration, championing the Kuaka as the reference point for the design.
It’s not just the wing form roof, there are subtle references of the kuaka throughout the building.”
The redevelopment project provided the Airport with the opportunity to bring the terminal to life in a way that mirrors Hawke’s Bay so that from the moment passengers disembark from their plane they have a sense of what the Bay is about and has to offer.
Dean explains that rather than just pictures on walls the focus is to bring a sense of Hawke’s Bay into the retail environment—roasted coffee, local wines and food.
“There will be three different retail opportunities in the new terminal.
All of that is about a level of service for passengers who have expressed a desire for more selection.
“We have more passengers now so we can sup-port a broader retail offering.
We will soon be going to the market with an RFP to procure operators for the three new retail spaces.”
Dean says it’s also about ensuring the expansive views over the airfield to the hills are protected so that the Hawke’s Bay’s beautiful landscape is very much in the picture from inside the building.
With careful thought given to how people will interact with their new terminal, Dean believes the passenger experience will be excellent.
“It’s an operational airport so we needed to make sure the layout of the building works from an operational perspective, and that extends to the car park in how people get from their cars and into the building and back out again.”
Reflecting on the project challenges Dean says the number one imperative is to ensure the preservation of the airlines operational integrity and passenger journey through the terminal throughout the construction phase.
“Communication with stakeholders is critical in a project like this and bringing everyone on the journey.
“We consult regularly with our airline partners to ensure there is no impact on their business while construction takes place.
“An airport is a very high-profile piece of infra-structure—this project is a once in a lifetime opportunity to create an iconic gateway to our region.”
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